Our heirloom seed

In 2020, the COVID pandemic hit with full force in Australia. As people became more concerned about food security, we noticed a surge in seed sales across both the country, and the world in general. Until that time, we had only been saving heirloom seed from a small number of our most prized crops, and relying on the valuable work of other bulk seed savers to provide us with the heirloom seed stock we had grown to love.

As we prepared to sow our Winter crops in 2020, the words SOLD OUT seemed to dominate the online shops of our regular seed suppliers. Saving our own seed from that point, was no longer a task we would do "if time and space permitted", it now became a necessity for the survival of Heirloom Naturally. 

Whilst it has meant a change in the way we grow our crops (saving seed from carrots for example, means the carrot must remain in the ground for what feels like an eternity, taking up space we would normally use for the next seasons crop), it has led to an significant increase in the availability of our seed stock, and in August 2021 we were delighted to officially launch "Seeds by Heirloom Naturally".  

Our seeds are open pollinated (pollinated by insects, bird or wind), heirloom varieties and are proven performers in our cool climate market garden. If you are searching for heirloom veggie seeds kept for flavour, growth habit and which look stunning both in the garden, and on your plate, look no further than Seeds by Heirloom Naturally. 

Head to our online shop to view our growing selection of heirloom seed.

Carrot flowers

The beautiful thing about letting heirloom crops go to flower is that they attract beneficial insects, such as this pair of lady bugs. Look out aphids!

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Preparing onion seed

We prepare our seed using old fashioned techniques of threshing and winnowing by hand to remove plant debris.

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Golden beetroot

Fit for a king (or queen!). We only save one variety of beetroot per season and ensure our silverbeet doesn't flower at the same time to prevent cross pollination.

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